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        Humankind is imbued with an instinctual motive force, to continue, to persevere. It is an inborn need to realize our best even against staggering odds. Once we are aware of our warrior nature, this adventure becomes easier simply because of that knowledge.

        The concept of the sage-as-warrior comes from ancient Tibet where the sage, rather than enjoying his solitude, hung around to benefit others who sought guidance in transcending joys and sufferings. Theese warrior sages are otherwise known as Bodhisattvas, and in recent years this reminds me of a phrase that Joseph Campbell used frequently when he discussed these people. They joyfully participated in the sorrows of the world.

        One lunchtime, I got into a conversation with Suzanne, a Taiwanese-born computer science student.

        “Your talk about warrior sages who 'stay behind'--” here, Suzanne emulated quotation marks with her fingers “--to help others strikes me as just plain pie-in-sky. Confucius had the real message. Totally practical. Your first loyalties are to your family and your superiors, your country and company. You've got: order, righteousness, faithfulness, and humanity.” She took a drink of iced tea and added, “I don't believe in any of this new-age, higher consciousness bullshit. Show me the money... you know? I'll help myself and my family.”





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Copyright 2001, Gary Kline